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MANILA - Wong tagged a junket agent and a casino high roller both Chinese nationals in the money laundered from the Bangladesh central bank.


Philstar


Speaking in Tagalog, Wong said “Dalawang foreigners ang nagpasok ng $81 million. Isa sa kanila ay matagal ng labas-pasok sa Pilipinas at kilalang junket agent at isang high roller,” (use google translation).


Gao Shuhua:

GMA Philippines

One of the identified foreigners is Gao Shuhua, a junket agent from Beijing, China. He had been working with Wong since 2007.


According to Wong, Gao once lost P450 m from gambling in the Solaire casino.


Wong said Gao, met Deguito (RCBC manager) at his office in Solaire in 2015. They talked about Gao wanting to open the dollar account. Dequito suggested a corporate account and that she needed the names of 5 people. Wong added that she asked for $2,500 to open the accounts which Gao agreed.


Ding Zhize:
google.ca

The other Chinese national allegedly involved in the money laundering scheme is Ding Zhize, a high roller from Macau.


It is estimated that $63 million went to Solaire while an estimated $17 million went to Philrem.


According to Solaire's legal counsel, Atty. Benny Tan, the casino has frozen the account of Ding's group, amounting to P107,350,602 in chips.


We confirm that we have frozen the account and we are waiting for a proper court order on how it will be disposed of,” Tan told the senators.


Wong said Gao and Ding wanted the $5 million to themselves, which he said was not part of the deal.


"Ang gentlemen's agreement, walang kukuning cash. Wala sa rules eh. So kaya natira ang $4.63 million dahil nag-aaway na kami. Ang kinuha nila $370,000. Nagagalit na ako kasi wala sa usapan na kukuha ng cash. Kasi itong negosyo namin usapan lang eh, tiwala lang. Sabi ko, 'Niloloko niyo na ako,'" he said (use google translator).


Wong on Thursday returned the $4.63 million to the Anti-Money Laundering Council.


Money trail:
May 15, 2015 : Fake dollar accounts were opened with an initial deposit of $500 each. Accounts remained idol until February 4, this year.


February 4, 2016 – Hackers broke into Bangladesh Bank's account with the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, ordering 35 transfers worth $951 million, bulk of which to be transferred to RCBC Jupiter branch. Due to lack of details, some requests were blocked. However, the $81 million went to the fake accounts.


February 5 to February 13 – Stolen funds from Bangladesh Bank were transferred to money transfer company Philrem Services Corporation. They converted them into peso, delivered to casino junket operator Weikangn Xu and to another company.


February 8: Bangladesh Bank sent a "stop payment" order to RCBC. The central bank was asking to refund the stolen funds or freeze the funds.


February 9: Bangladesh Bank requested a refund or freeze them for proper investigation.
Despite the "stop payment" RCBC did not heed the request. The bank allowed $58.1m withdrawals from the accounts.


February 16: Bangladesh Bank Governor Atiur Rahman said that the swift code MT105 use to transfer money “is fraudulent.” He asked help for the return of the $81 m.


February 19: The Anti-Money Laundering Council (AMLC) started its investigation.


February 23 : William So Go said he was informed by that she opened fictitious dollar and peso bank accounts for Century tex at RCBC Jupiter without his knowledge.


February 29: The Philippine Daily Inquirer broke the story, citing documents shown by a representative of RCBC Jupiter branch manager Maia Santos-Deguito.


March 1: The Court of Appeals froze 6 accounts of Cruz, Lagrosas, Vergara, Vasquez, So Go, Centurytex Trading, Kam Sin Wong, and other related accounts. (READ: RCBC manager, others face anti-money laundering complaint)


March 15: The Senate Blue Ribbon Committee in the Philippines conducted its first hearing on the Bangladesh Bank fund heist.
The Bangladesh Bank governor resigned, while 3 of his subordinates were fired.


March 17: The Senate Blue Ribbon Committee probe, RCBC discloses that Go's signatures in his supposed Jupiter accounts were fake.


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